Professors Mislead FCC on Basic Copyright Law

Cross-posted from the Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) blog. In a letter submitted to the FCC late last week defending the Commission’s deeply flawed set-top box proposal,[1] a group of professors make an incredible claim: Everyone is perfectly free to distribute copyrighted works online however they please. No license? No problem! According […]

Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of “Moral Turpitude”

This past Friday, the Board of Immigration Appeals held that criminal copyright infringement constitutes a “crime involving moral turpitude” under immigration law. The Board reasoned that criminal copyright infringement is inherently immoral because it involves the willful theft of property and causes harm to both the copyright owner and society. The respondent, Raul Zaragoza-Vaquero, was […]

IP Scholars to FCC: It’s Not About “The Box”

Cross-posted from the Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) blog. This past April, we joined other IP scholars in explaining how the FCC’s proposed set-top box rules would undermine the property rights of creators and copyright owners. In reply comments filed last month, the EFF and a group of IP academics argued that […]

Copyright Policy Should Be Based On Facts, Not Rhetoric

Kevin Madigan and I have a post that was published at IPWatchdog. Here’s a brief excerpt: After nearly twenty years with the DMCA, the Copyright Office has launched a new study to examine the impact and effectiveness of this system, and voices on both sides of the debate have filed comments expressing their views. For […]